Stock Market Likely to Crash From Here

1 Mar

Triple Top?

The S&P 500 and Dow Jones are both once again near all-time highs…for the third time.  The old saying third time’s a charm can work both ways when it comes to the stock market.  Sometimes an index will bust through to new highs, and other times it will fail spectacularly crashing to new lows.

We should all be watching the behavior of the major indexes here, because the possibility of a major triple-top failure is quite high, for reasons outlined below.

If the S&P 500 fails at the triple top and breaks down, from a charting perspective the next thing for it to do is revisit the bottom and then make up its mind as to what it wants to do next.  The implication here is that a major failure of the S&P 500 will open the possibility of it revisiting the 600-800 level, or some 45% to 60% lower from the 1,500 level where it currently churns.

It will take some time to get to that level, typically 3-6 months, unless there’s some sort of financial accident to hasten things along, in which case it could all be over in a month or two.

SP-500-triple-top

Assuming a failure at the triple top, we’ll just have to watch and see what the market wishes to do once it plumbs the bottom once again.  For now, the daily and weekly charts of the S&P 500 show waning momentum, and the weekly chart remains near overbought territory .

sp500 weekly

sp500 daily

Sell in May and Go Away

Of course, another old adage that applies to the stock market is sell in May and go away, which has proven to be a remarkably effective strategy over the years.  The average return between May and September is -0.5%, while it is over 12% for the rest of the year.

However, given the macro forces at play at this time, this May-to-September period could easily offer much more dramatic losses than 0.5%.  I am personally thinking as much as two full orders of magnitude greater, as -50% is right in the middle of my target window for losses.

Danger Ahead

Technically stocks are overbought. Fundamentally, the picture is even worse: they are facing a litany of economic drags (including weakening GDP growth, higher taxes, the impact of Obamacare, sequester cuts, high gasoline prices, chronic unemployment, etc.) and robust insider selling.  We explore these fundamental risks and their likely impact in great depth in Part II.

For all of these reasons, equity markets face a very high chance of falling over 40% between now and fall of 2013.  (Yes, I’m aware of how extreme a price prediction this is.)

While there’s always a chance that the Fed can keep things magically elevated and they’ve done a very good job so far –  it is my view that they cannot do this for much longer without a serious correction to justify an even larger program of overt and covert intervention.

Once a bottom is reached again, this might be anywhere from 40% to 60% lower than the current ~1500 level on the S&P 500 the process will begin to be dominated by rising government borrowing, which will cause interest rates to begin to rise. 

When that happens, expect capital to flee the paper market for hard assets.  In particular, that’s when the upwards price revolution in the gold and silver markets will kick into high gear.

Source: marketoracle.co.uk

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One Response to “Stock Market Likely to Crash From Here”

  1. Shahid I 30 April 2013 at 8:33 pm #

    With vix at record low levels and margin accts at record highs this suggests we have a situation where the mkt like 07/08 is re leveraged . Whilst, record low corp and high yield spreads suggest the bernanke put is as powerful as greenspans.

    Risk premias as a result across all asset classes are low …. of course they are not ! if you compare them with zero base rates. nevertheless we need a decent level of economic growth to justify them. Economic data is relapsing.

    All said that guarantees more unconventional policy? And mitigation of material downside?

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